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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 407 (some duplicates have been removed)
plan. >> excellence. >> well executed. >> i thank you. >> a lot of criticism of fema back in katrina. today we hear nothing but good about fema. >> i thank craig would lives and breathes this stuff. >>neil: not so fast because all in rescueville is not so great. a lot of the folks they represent would like to kick them in the ass. this is the reality. welcome, everyone, not so happy friday. mr. president, you may want to wait on the "heck of a job" thing because rescue efforts have become heck of a joke for folks in the northeast fuming. because the help isn't coming. in gas. no power. no food. they have had it. >> restaurants and boats and homes are looted. >> the coast guard has not been here to help. >> come here and walk into the streets here. the water is this high. you have to wear the waders. >>neil: that is just on staten island. homes are swamps. motorists are stuck if -- in gas lines, four hours or more if you can find a place to fill in. two-thirds of gas stations even now in new york and new jersey remain shut down. out of juice. out of gas. thousands are fuming, out of p
president al gore talking about hurricane katrina in his 2006 academy winning documentary, an inconvenient truth. the movie for those of you who have not seen it, warns us that due to climate change, we will experience many more super storms like sandy which forecasters say was the largest hurricane in atlantic history. climate change deniers will say the weather has always been weird. here are some inconvenient truths that they may want to consider. in the 1970s, there were just an average of under eight named storms per year. named storms like the a b c. in the 198hehe ample w ju ju u uerer nine ---- the average was just under nine per year. in the 1990s, it was about 11 named storms per year. in the 2000s it jumped to nearly 15 storms a year and get this, in the first three years of this decade, 2010, 2011, 2012 the average is just under 19. specifically, we had 19 named storms in 2010. we had 18 in 2011 and so far we've had 19 named storms and there is an entire month left in hurricane season this year
their roovs two days after sandy, in scenes reminiscent of katrina. also reports of a desperate search for two children, swept away from their mom in the storm surge. and then word that the death toll had nearly doubled to 14. it was becoming clear that staten island, a sleepy enclave best known as the name sake for the famous staten island ferry, was a world away from the rest of this city which today was getting moving again. so, we hopped in the car outside of our office in manhattan, expecting a journey that would be made very difficult by the city's maddening post-storm grid lock. instead, the real problems became getting gas. we drove around northern new jersey for hours encountering lines and frustrated people. >> aggravating. that storm did its thing. knocked out everything. >> reporter: we were only saved by some relatives of one of our colleagues who brought us a two-gallon jug of gas. >> just keep it. >> reporter: it's okay. finally, we arrived. and look at what we saw next from our window. >> the transformer blew up and took the whole store down. that's my open sign to the store. i
. a housing cyclone that hollowed out more homes that hurricane katrina and sandy combined. the very definition of disaster needs broadening. we need to recapture the initial horror created by those single natural disaster and put it toward the relief of our on going national disasters. the energy gathered by gale force winds has the power to focus our public attention. superstorm sandy may help the electorate focus in the few days that remain in the 2012 presidential campaign. our vote on tuesday will be for a disaster manager and chief taking charge of a country in an economic state of emergency, building a society that leaves all of us more prepared for disaster. at my table is ari melber, msnbc contributor. norry tan dan, kate dawson and david rodi, a reuters columnist and contributor for the atlantic. thank you all for being here. >> i want to start with you. the article, the piece you wrote was about the inequalities that have been revealed in the con te context of sandy. >> i am one of the privileged new yorkers. there has always been divisions in the city but this storm broug
fugate to do that and signed off on jeb bush to do this, there was this hangover from katrina going back in the bush administration and there's always been a point of emphasis, if you will, on fema by the obama administration. i think frankly it won't have mattered who came into the presidency in the post katrina world there was going to be an emphasis on fema. you weren't going to let that get politicized. yes, it's a political appointee and you're going to have somebody who came with a background to do this stuff. so i think that they realize that it's a high-wire act, this emergency management business. and most of the time if you do a good job it's good politics. if you blow it, it's really bad politics. >> i agree. >> it can be unrecoverable politics. so this is a case where good politics and good public policy and good management all converge. it's good politics to do a good job. you're not playing one side against the other. >> you know, i've always thought that the democrats being the government party because they believe in government more than republicans owe a greater debt, a
overseas and with hurricane katrina down in new orleans, and they say it does not look much different. walking around and having it be dead silent and hearing the hissing of natural gas coming out of the ground, we are still as of yesterday in search and rescue mode to be sure everyone is out of their house and safe before they allow people to come back. it is a very frustrating time. i can tell you what he was talking about on the earlier call, i had the opportunity last night to talk to some people in the shelters and they are amazed at the amount of people willing to help, total strangers. random citizens donating goods to try to help their fellow man. it is unfortunate it takes a tragic event like this to bring the best out of people. host: what is the best way the federal government can help your district? guest: first of all, the president has been doing everything he needed to do along with the governor in giving the governor of the tools that we need here in new jersey to get this process started. it is going to be a multi-year process to get us headed back in the right direct
costs will surpass those from hurricanes irene and katrina. although there are countless businesses hurt, others could see a boost. erika miller reports. >> reporter: when you consider the massive amounts of flooding, downed trees, and damage to transportation networks, it could take days-- if not weeks, to tally up the financial costs from the storm. but already there are predictions sandy will be the most expensive clean-up in u.s. history. the most serious damage appears to be caused by flooding along the east coast. according to economic tracking firm i.h.s. global insight, property damage will likely surpass $20 billion. add to that as much as $30 billion in lost business, and the total financial toll could end up being close to $50 billion. hotels, stores, airlines, and restaurants have lost business they wot get back. insurance companies will have to make big payouts, which will likely mean higher insurance premiums for customers down the road. here in new york city, commerce has been crippled. and power is not expected to be restored in many areas until next week. i.h.s. global p
. afterrhurricanes katrina and read it, the fund was $18 billion in the hole and still has that debt. then there is the issue of management. the government accountability office wrote a stinging criticism of the agency just last year describing? as actuarially unsound. it's systems are antiquated, running on pen and paper and imagine that, rather than computers. the department's at local state and national levels as a result have a difficult time communicating with fema. according to that report because of many of the process is the manual, the culture have become dependent on individual people. staff relying on personal relationships to accomplish tasks. including -- concluded from the gao, a total revamp. maybe that is why the improperly paid nearly $100 million to hurricane victims after katrina and rita between 2005 and 2010. just earlier this month the agency waived its demands for repayment. altogether, 371 million was paid out in error. taken a reminder to everybody out there, that's our money fellow taxpayers. remember katrina trailers, 145,000 of them deemed unsafe because t
it will be sold for a plot of property on the beach. >> did we learn enough from katrina? it seems that people did evacuate, but we didn't have the same problems post-katrina that we did last time in terms of people getting to safety ahead of the storm. from your observation, do you think that's accurate? >> i think all of our professional forecasters -- boy, did they get the right. a week out, they knew this tropical system was going to explode, the way it did take this left hook into new jersey. it has been katrina-esque. the man holding the camera, dwyane scott, was with me in new orleans overnight for that storm. for weeks thereafter, we've been talking about it nonstop today. we may have to rethink some of our shoreline rules and definitions. we've got governors of three states, christie, malloy, cuomo, those three states are talking about a new shoreline and maybe a new normal. maybe we need our folks at the weather channel to tell us, is this a 200-year storm or the start of 200 years worth of storms like this. >> is there a spirit of rebuilding here? do you hear frit the locals? have you b
, this storm costs upwards of $50 billion, making it the second costliest storm after katrina. but atlantic city studios are allowed re-entry today. 95 sandy related deaths are reported in the u.s., including two brothers, ages 2 the and 4, and new york city staten island tt he centepicenter of the casu today. many are remaining powerless and they're not homeless, as well. and residents say the response is coming a bit too late. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> we just want everyone to know that we are hurting down here and we need help immediately. >> msnbc's richard lui is now in staten island with more for us. richard, good morning. >> thomas, very good morning to you. we're right here by the bay. several marinas in staten island and this corner has been hurt so much. if you lived in this area, you would have 30, 40-foot tall yachts sitting in your front yard. i was speaking with representative michael grim a little earlier. this is his district. and i asked him about the shelters. where are people going and what do they need? this is what he told me. >> they need
andrew and katrina. welcome, mr. dan tony. how do you think this storm is going to rank as compared with the biggest storm ever, which was katrina, in terms of insured losses, and andrew? >> well, katrina was an $80 billion insurance convenient, not take nothing consideration the economic impact as well. and a much different type of storm. the biggest problem with sandy it is a densely populated area of the country. early on in the claims process, i believe that the estimates of $20 billion range could be close. then you also have to look at the economic impact with the new york stock exchange being closed for two days, quite a few petroleum refineries shutdown along the east coast that could have an effect, as you had in an earlier broadcast that the airlines -- >> talk me -- >> thousands of flights. >> let's say i'm a small business owner, i own a pizza shop on the jersey shore or i own a dry cleaner out in queens that was damaged, what typically is covered under my business policy that i carry and what suspect? if it's flooding is it covered? >> unfortunately, flooding is an addi
experiences are chronicled in the book, the great delusion. >> well, we did have the 2005 hurricane katrina which devastated the gulf south america. we had 2000 people killed in that disaster. we have never had something like this, and actual disaster. what was learned from katrina is that george w. bush got a lot of phones down for doing a flyover and for not going into louisiana. for acting like he could look at it from a distance. all politicians have learned from his mistakes. uc barack obama cancelling his campaign, going to new jersey, and meeting with chris christie, a republican. most people in the u.s. he has done a good job. he was talking with the army corps as engineers. in that regard, it has helped, getting all the face time on the television when you don't see much of mitt romney. >> it has been striking, hasn't it, to see him with the governor and listening to the two of them congratulate and thank each other in this campaign we have seen such bitter politics. to see a democrat and republican coming together like this. >> that is supposed to be the best of america, when ther
airlines to talk about the impact on the industry and the man who led fema during hurricane katrina will tell us what the federal emergency agency should expect from this storm. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use, it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. you have to dig a little. fidelity's etf market tracker shows you the big picture on how different asset classes are performing, and it lets you go in for a closer look at areas within a class or sector that may be bucking a larger trend. i'm stephen hett of fidelity investments. the etf market tracker is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. get 200 free trades today and explore your next investing idea. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. >> we talked
with hurricane katrina. here's live in studio with me just moments away. >>> and you know this storm is throwing a big monkey-wrench into the battle for the white house. battleground states are in hurricane sandy's path. which candidate does the storm help or hurt? what if there was a new way to deal with money that focused less on fees and more... on what matters? maybe your bank account is taking too much time and maybe it's costing too much money. introducing bluebird by american express and walmart. your alternative to checking and debit. it's loaded with features, not fees. because we think your money should stay where it belongs. with you. the value you expect. the service you deserve. it feels good to bluebird. get it at your local walmart. >>> this is your prais for breaking coverage of hurricane sandy and the election. we will be carrying this at least until 11:00 p.m. eastern tonight, possibly longer if it warrants, because this storm is forecast to be a monster when it makes landfall. don't go anywhere. a lot of people said they are holed up in hotel rooms and stuck at airports watchi
and disasters i'm absolutely confronted by these two americas, the katrina/fema reaction and the sandy/fema reaction and the reality is to argue there hasn't been a significant political response to the significance of fema by different governments and it's not split down party lines. it's simply not true. there was a really great article in "mother jones" that took you through -- >> the development of fema competence. >> right. and who had headed fema and the way that presidents had appointed those fema heads were directly related to how they perceived their significance. so, for example, george bush actually allocated michael brown who was the former -- i just had to read this out, because i was just blown away. michael brown who was the former commissioner of judges and stewards for the international arabian horse association, that's who headed fema. clinton was the first -- was the first president to allocate the fema head who actually had experience -- >> disaster. >> -- disaster management. it's not political. it's about poverty. it's about race. and when we think about disaster
was not sufficient with all the traumas from katrina and manmade traumas, we have not thought about what we need to do to protect ourselves from these natural and unnatural attacks. hopefully this is what this wake-up call will do for us. >> well certainly they won't be leaving major equipment in basements. major mris were down underwater. they were pumping it out and it's all saltwater, which is very destructive. it will be millions of dollars. >> eliot: and saltwater is enormously destructive. that's part of what caused the con ed transformers to blow up. i'm worried about what it will take to rebuild this infrastructure. that makes the case. cost will be vast. >> you can see the gridlock that we're experiencing. if you try to move through manhattan it takes you hours. it shows how dependent we really are on the subway system. we have to get it up and running. our hospitals functioning again. it's a huge challenge. i've never seen the federal state and city government work more more hormonously. and the president just said, i'm telling everyone to get back to them in 15 minutes. i can get ever
up in flames and four other houses. >> we think back about katrina and what a big impact that was on our country, we rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm, we think of the aftermath. right now we're in the aftermath period in terms of sandy. tell me how you feel about that. and before we get to rebuilding, people taking care of continuing damage right now, how do you assess the coordination between the state, federal, and local municipalities? >> i think we're doing very well. i think the president's response has been terrific, really. it's been coordinated unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard governor christie, who is a republican with president obama working together, and that's how it's been from the president, to the governor, to the counties and the towns. one of the things that i did today was talk to fema about trying to get an office and staff person in various parts of the district today, and they're working on it, and with the money that comes to downs for recovery to rebuild board walks or municipal buildings, i t
to realize that this is our katrina. >> the obama administration responded to complaints that fema was late on the scene and anountsed that the deputy administrator will be there tomorrow and fema wants everyone who needs assistance to call. when there's complaintcomplaint because they haven't been able to reach out. 1- 800-621-fema or disast disasterassistance.gov. >>> president obama was back on the trail. >> in new jersey yesterday and saw the devastation and you really get a sense of how difficult this is going to be for a lot of people. but you know, we've been inspired these past few days. because when disaster strikes, we see america at its best. the consumer in these times all seem to melt away. there are no democrats or republicans during the storm. just fellow americans. >> his response to the storm has earned him big praise. 78% approve of how he's dealt with the hurricane. images and headlines like this have helped, too, featuring chris christie of new jersey on a bipartisan storm damage tour together from wednesday. but not everyone's a fan of the federal agencies that handle
. it is not katrina but we are a close second. >>shepard: any time your house is without power or full of water or on the ground you have your own private katrina. a lot of the people staying at your hotel which is not normal, they are from there. >>guest: yes, we own two hotel s in the same parking lot here so we have been here for ten years and we have opened up at the world trade center so we are used to disaster. no one realized how bad this is and on wednesday when we thought the people who are here if a couple of days would leave, we thought it would get better and it was not getting better, we called the marathon people and said we would not send our neighbors into the street and we are going to need to tell the marathon people they is to go someplace else. >>shepard: you are not the only one calling the marathon people. this is a cover of the "new york post" owned by the parent company saying abuse of power, with generators that will power tenths for the marathon folks. listen to what happened on fox business network, where we share resources. here is what happened: charlie gasparino sa
they have a lot in common with the people of the gulf coast who suffered through katrina in 2005. the sheer size and scope of the destruction from hurricane sandy stretches for hundreds of miles, from the jersey shore, to long island. this was a big storm, and has brought a significant part of the country to its knees. >> look at this line! it goes back -- this line goes six miles. look at this! >> reporter: with power still out to millions of people, one of the biggest daily concerns has become gasoline. some lines at stations that still have gas stretched for blocks. tempers of the drivers in those lines frayed. and police have even been called in to patrol the lines to keep the peace. >> i need to run my taxi too. >> reporter: there were some signs of meaningful progress. in new york city, more train and subway service was added. all told, the electricity is back on for more than 4 million homes and businesses across the northeast. >> oh, my god! >> reporter: this evening, the lights came back on in new york's greenwich village, something worth celebrating. and all but two of atlantic ci
> this is a new jersey katrina. >> plus, peter greenberg with our survival guide. what to do if you're sanded t the airport. required to give you a for free? never check ld bag. now from battery park in new york city, this is "extra. >> hey, everybody, i'm maria enounos. t was a scary nightn new ork city, mario, between the looding and the winds. was right by a hotel door that completely shattered from he impact. wow, , the shots that were it's really nbelievable. what's it like to get around there? >> it's virtually impossible. have an army of photogs including alec and hilaria who shot from their apartment. some let's get to breaking news. transformed pple water world, histstoric far as the eye can see. and in the ound sky. than 30 dead, boats tossed a megatrail of destruction. >> forecast to be a superstorm and boy was it ever. >> a historic storm in every measure. subways swamped ground zero inundated. repoers up and down the east oast braving thelements. aught in sandy's fury. worst wind that had. >> weather channel meteorologist jim cantore with maria today. feel like it wa
you wondering whether private enterprise can work, we know from walmart and katrina it works. >> walmart and budweiser, gave truckloads of water, not necessarily beer, i know you were disappointed with that. but think of katrina, $2,000 debit cards they worked out well, people went out and bought tattoos and flat screen tvs, we have the mobile homes,. neil: in the mud. >> they sold them for a deep discount, and lost about a billion in that. governor jindal from new orleans, was complaining that federal government messes it up every step of the way, how could you expect them to do well, we could do much better if you just gave us the money, that is what mitt romney says, get federal bureaucrats out. neil: when this came out today, his back up against the wall, what to you say governor? do you say no fema? what do you think he should say. >> right now, it is a very delicate time, i'm not a politician, i say fema screws it up just about every time they get hole of it since they began in carter administration, whether it is a republican or a democrat, but still screwed up, and th
-- for hurricane isaac and hurricane katrina seven years ago -- both hit, i want to point out here both hit during the week of the homosexual event called southern decadence in new orleans. >> this makes me a bad homo, but i have never even heard of southern decadence. >> it sounds cool. >> we let the straights in. >> i'm in. >> bill: how big of you. >> what it is is that we have a hot line to god, and we're pulling the strings behind the scenes. >> bill: i got it. you know zap him. there are four important ballot measures on the ballot this year, dealing with marriage equality, maryland maine, washington state is the -- well they are all big. >> yeah. >> bill: and then minnesota. what is the difference? >> minnesota's is a constitutional -- anti-gay constitution issue. that would ban it. the other ones are affirmative, right? to maryland and washington both passed in the state legislature marriage equal this year but then anti-gay folks got enough signatures to get enough signatures to put it on the ballot. in maine it was sort of a heart breaker. so everybody is real c
katrina. he says relief money was spent on bags and massage parlors. one of the things we thought you should know. but first, today nate silver of "the new york times" forecasted president obama had 77% chance of winning re-election and now 299 votes and governor romney 239. >>> welcome back. president obama was supposed to be in ohio today before canceling the visit due to hurricane sandy and the damage caused. despite being off the trail, the latest poll of ohio voters gives the president a five-point edge and seems to show growing optimism about the economy of white working class voters and could be the reason seeing him hold on to the lead and, quote, if you look at the body language of the campaign hard not to conclude they believe they're behind. and if they believe ohio is a be all end all then they're behind. let's bring in editor mark murray. before we talk about the poll, i want to play what vice president joe biden said regarding this car ad or auto ad running brought to you by the romney campaign and called misleading and slammed by gm and chrysler. let me play it. >> they
a comparison with hurricane katrina. i want to use it as an analogy. but the analogy here that might be helpful, we think back to katrina and what that meant to us as a nation. we very rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i di
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 407 (some duplicates have been removed)

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